AWR, Inc. is a non-profit, 501(c)3 organization dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation, and release of sick, injured and orphaned wildlife in Central Florida.

Our Purpose

Greater than 90% of the animals that we rescue are injured due to the consequences of human neglect towards the wildlife and their habitat. These animals are hit by cars, suffer gunshot wounds, become entangled in fishing line or other trash, ingest plastic bags, and the over development of their habitat has produced injury causing obstructions such as powerlines and buildings.

Ahopha is a word taken from the Lakota Indian language that means “to treat with respect”. As the majority of animals that we rescue suffer as a result of neglect by humans vs natural causes, we feel obligated to give them a second chance at life.

Education is paramount at Ahopha Wildlife Rescue. We are committed to reaching out to the general public, adults as well as our youth, to foster an understanding of the importance of two of the greatest natural resources in Florida, the diverse and fascinating wildlife, as well as the environment we share with the animals.

Greater than 90% of the animals that we rescue are injured due to the consequences of human neglect towards the wildlife and their habitat. These animals are hit by cars, suffer gunshot wounds, become entangled in fishing line or other trash, ingest plastic bags, and the over development of their habitat has produced injury causing obstructions such as powerlines and buildings. 
   
Ahopha is a word taken from the Lakota Indian language that means “to treat with respect”. As the majority of animals that we rescue suffer as a result of neglect by humans vs natural causes, we feel obligated to give them a second chance at life. 
 
Education is paramount at Ahopha Wildlife Rescue. We are committed to reaching out to the general public, adults as well as our youth, to foster an understanding of the importance of two of the greatest natural resources in Florida, the diverse and fascinating wildlife, as well as the environment we share with the animals.

December Fund - Donate to Support

December Ahopha Donations

$20 of $1,000 raised
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Donation Total: $25.00

To mail in a donation, please make checks payable to Ahopha Wildlife Rescue.

P.O. Box 508
DeLeon Springs, FL
32720

Follow Ahopha On Instagram

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Did you know that Amazon Smiles is now on your Amazon shopping app? *If you don't know what this is, it's a great way to donate to your favorite while shopping with Amazon throughout the year. *Amazon will donate 0.5% of the purchase price from your eligible purchases to the charity of your choice. *Just follow these simple instructions in the screenshots and PLEASE add us Ahopha Wildlife Rescue, Inc. as your organization of choice. *We need as much financial help as possible, so we can continue to keep rescuing and rehabilitating for next year, so this is such a great way to give while your shopping this holiday season. We Thank YOU and the local wildlife thanks you too!!

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Tom, our Ahopha Wildlife rescuer, is tirelessly at it again. This time in College Park, FL, searching for an Anhinga in distress with a foreign material lodged in its beak. Let's hope he can locate and rescue this bird from certain death. *View the news story and video on our Facebook page at Ahopha Wildlife Rescue.

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🐿️🎃🐿️🎃🐿️🎃🐿️🎃 Squirrels and birds absolutely LOVE pumpkins! Don't let them go to waste. When you are finished with your pumpkin after Halloween, don't just throw it in the garbage to rot. Set it out in your yard or take it to a local wooded area for the wildlife to enjoy. One pumpkin will provide enough of a healthy snack to every bird, squirrel and other wild animal that happens to come upon it. If you really like birdwatching, try repurposing your old pumpkin into a temporary bird feeder. Add some seeds and nuts and watch them go crazy over it! 🐿️🎃🐿️🎃🐿️🎃🐿️🎃 ahophawildlife.org

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Thank you @cityofdeland, @the_table_deland restaurant and @Sanbornactivitycenter for a wonderful 2019 Volunteer of the Year Awards Banquet! Tom Scotti was humbled to be nominated and very happy to stand with and be recognized among many of the other volunteers within our community. Congratulations to the winners, Paul Jones and Mario Davis. Thank you all, for your service to our beautiful city!

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We will not be available for any wildlife rescue service on Monday 9/30/19 or Tuesday 10/01/19. For any wildlife emergencies please contact FWC at 1-888-404-3922. They can provide phone numbers of wildlife rehabilitators in your area that can assist you. We apologize for any inconvenience and we should be able to resume our service on Wednesday 10/02/19. 🐿️🐇🐭🐾🦃🐺🦅🐻🦃🦇🦉🦊

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Here is video proof that reuniting baby squirrels with their mother is always possible! 🙏👏 Thank you to Colleen Duckett in South Carolina for following our re-nesting instructions and saving this baby! Isn't it the best feeling? You Rock!🐿️ If anyone wants to follow our re-nesting instructions, you can find them on our Facebook page! 🎥 Video credit: Colleen Duckett #squirrellivesmatter #squirrelsofinstagram #squirrel #squirrellife

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Remember these 2 little babies that were rescued back in July? One was a victim of a dog bite and the other, a cat (in two separate rescues). Well, now they are fully rehabbed, raised up and almost ready for release back into the wild! They are currently being acclimated to the weather and sounds of the outdoors in a large enclosure that allows them to learn how to scamper, climb, jump from limb to limb, play and interact with the wild squirrels through the screen, and even forage for food on the ground. Very soon, they will be running through the trees in the wild, on their very own! 🎥📷: @squirlgrl46 #squirrellivesmatter #sistersfromanothermother #FloridaWildlife #squirrels #ahophawildliferescue

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YAY, for a SUCCESSFUL RELEASE tonight!🦉 Earlier this month, we rescued a Barred Owl that had been hit by a car and as a result, suffered head trauma that prevented it from flying. After a few weeks of flight reconditioning and rehabilitative care at The Avian Reconditioning Center for Birds of Prey, this beautiful owl is now able to return back to her home in the EXACT same location from where he was rescued! 👏 Many thanks and appreciation goes out to the Avian Reconditioning Center for Birds of Prey @arc4raptors, for helping us with this rehab. It was a beautiful release right at dusk this evening! (See video) 🎥: Cele Lopez Please visit our website at: ahophawildlife.org #florida #wildlife #owls #nature #happyendings

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We have been bombarded with orphaned baby Squirrel calls almost everyday for weeks. Most times, these babies are not orphaned and have just fallen from the tree. It's very easy to reunite them with their parent, it just takes a little patience and a watchful eye. Head over to our Facebook page to see our full instructions on how to properly reunite a baby squirrel with it's mother. The best mom for these babies is their squirrel mom.🐿️

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Many people who find tiny rodents in their yard have asked the question, "Is this a Squirrel or a Rat"? When these little rodents first come into the world, they are born blind with their eyes sealed shut and are bald with pink skin, making it almost impossible to tell which is which with the average eye. Aside from differentiating the rat's elongated head with the squirrel's more rounded shaped head, shorter snout and slightly larger body, the BEST way to tell the difference, is to look at their toenails! Baby squirrels will always have dark or black toenails, where rats and mice have whitish, pink toenails. So, if you happen to rescue a little baby rodent in your yard and want to know what it is, just look at it's feet! 🐾🐿️🐀🐁 @ahophawildliferescue ahophawildlife.org

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Here are 2 of our weekend rescues: PICTURE #1: A juvenile Sandhill Crane with a piece of lightweight rubber tubing on its lower mandible. The foreign object trapped the crane's tongue against the lower mandible, severely hindering its ability to drink or eat. We were able to capture the crane, remove the foreign object and release him back to his parents. PICTURE #2: A couple found this Barred Owl in distress yesterday. She was found in their yard, by the road. After watching the owl for a few minutes, they determined it warranted a rescue call, since the owl had not tried to move or fly away. One of our rehabilitators went out to retrieve the owl and took it to the animal hospital for x-rays . Thankfully, nothing broken, but has a minor head injury, most likely from being hit/bumped by a vehicle. The owl is eating well and resting, while being monitored for a few days before having a follow-up xray and attempt to release back into the wild. *A big Thank You goes out to 2 sets of wonderful people for noticing and calling in these 2 situations. Your attention to wildlife saved 2 birds! 🙏🦉

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PLEASE CHECK FOR NESTS BEFORE CUTTING YOUR TREES: Today we received a 3rd baby squirrel into rehabilitative care as a result of tree trimming/nest destroyed. We cannot stress enough the importance of checking your trees before you decide to cut. Baby squirrels are born in the months of January-February and then again in July-August. The mother squirrels tend to hide their young in leaf nests up in the tall oak trees and they will also nest at the tops of palms, inside the fronds which provide safety from predators. Along with squirrels, there are many other birds that nest in the trees, so it is very important to look up before you start. If you have to trim a tree with an active nest in it, trim around the nest, doing your best not to disturb it. Mother squirrel may run away from all the noise, but she will come back once the activity is finished and all is quiet again. If a nest does come down, do your best to gather up as much of it as possible and carefully place it in a water resistant container with drainage holes so it won't hold water (such as a basket or a colander). Attach it securely to the trunk of the tree about 5 feet above the ground. If you find a baby squirrel on the ground because it has fallen out of the nest, follow the same procedure, but put grass clippings & leaves in the container first before putting the baby in the makeshift nest. Move away from the area and watch for mother squirrel to return to her babies. Please be sure there is nothing in the area (children playing, loud noises, cats or dogs) that may bother the babies and prevent the mother from coming back to her babies. If for some reason mother squirrel does not come back for her babies after 4hrs from the time the activity has subsided, then it is time to call us at 386-233-1054. Many people believe that if you touch & handle a baby squirrel, the mother squirrel will not take the babies back. This is not true. The mother squirrel will always take her young back, so that is why we say to put the babies into a makeshift nest & attach it to the original tree, or the closest tree available in the area (as close to its original location as possible). ==> Continued in comments